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Cruise Directory : Glossary : S
• S = Sierra
ierra
Meaning
:
My engines are going full speed astern

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S.S.

Steamship.

S/T

Short tons (2,000 lbs.).

SAC

special area of conservation

SALVAGE

The property which has been recovered from a wrecked vessel, or the recovery of the vessel herself.

Sam

surface to air missile

SAR

search and rescue

SART

search and rescue radar transponder

SAS

safety at sea

SATELLITE NAVIGATION

a form of position finding using radio transmissions from satellites with sophisticated on-board automatic equipment.

SATPM

Saturday P.M.

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SB

Safe Berth

SCOPE

Technically, the ratio of length of anchor rode in use to the vertical distance from the bow of the vessel to the bottom of the water. usually six to seven to one for calm weather and More scope in storm conditions.

SCOPIC 

Special Compensation P&I Clause

SCR 

Special Casualty Representative (P&I)

SCREW

A boat's propeller.

Scull

moving the rudder back and forth in an attempt to move the boat forward

SCUPPERS

Drain holes on deck, in the toe rail, or in bulwarks or (with Drain pipes) in the deck itself.

SD (or SID)

Single Decker

SDW

summer dead weight

SEA COCK

A through hull valve, a shut off on a plumbing or drain pipe between the vessel's interior and the sea.

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SEA ROOM

a safe distance from the shore or other hazards.

SEA TRIALS

A series of trials conducted by the builders during which the owner's representatives on board act in a consulting and checking capacity to determine if the vessel has met the specifications.

SEA WORTHINESS

the sufficiency of a vessel in materials construction, equipment, crew and outfit for the trade in which It is employed. Any sort of disrepair to the vessel by which the cargo may suffer -- overloading, untrained officers, etc., may constitute a vessel unseaworthy.

SEABEE

Sea-barge, a barge carrier design similar to "LASH" but which uses rollers to move the barges aboard the ship; the self-propelled loaded barges are themselves loaded on board as cargo and are considerably larger than those loaded on LASH ships.

SEAFREIGHT

Costs charged for transporting goods over the sea. This does not cover haulage or loading/discharging costs but the sea transport only

SEAMANSHIP

All the arts and skills of boat handling, ranging from maintenence and repairs to piloting, sail handling, marlinespike work, and rigging.

SEAWORTHINESS

Statement of condition of the vessel (valid certificates, fully equipped and manned etc.)

SEAWORTHINESS CERTIFICATE

a certificate issued by a classification society surveyor to allow a vessel to proceed after she has met with a mishap that may have affected its seaworthiness. It is frequently issued to enable a vessel to proceed, after temporary repairs have been effected, to another port where permanent repairs are then carried out.

SEAWORTHY

A boat or a boat's gear able to meet the usual sea conditions.

SECOND ASSISTANT ENGINEER

In charge of twelve to four watch. On steam vessels has responsibility for the boilers, on diesels, the evaporators and the auxiliary equipment.

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SECOND MATE

in charge of twelve to four watch. ships Navigation officer. Keeps charts (maps) up to date and monitors Navigation equipment on bridge.

SECURE

to make fast.

SELFD

Self Discharging

SELF-SUSTAINING SHIP

a containership which has her own crane for loading and discharging shipping containers enabling the ship to serve ports which do not have suitable lifting equipment.

SELF-TRIMMING SHIP

a ship whose holds re shaped in such a way that the cargo levels itself.

SELF-UNLOADER

a bulk carrier which is equipped with gear for unloading cargo.

SEMI-TRAILERS

Are usually 12.0 meter flat bed road trailers

SENC

System Electronic Navigational Chart

SES

satellite earth station,Seafarers' Education Service

SET

direction toward which the current is flowing.

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SF

Stowage Factor. Cubic space (measurement tonne) occupied by one tonne (2,240 lbs/1,000 kgs) of cargo

Shake out

to release a reefed sail and hoist the sail aloft

Sheave

the wheel of a block pulley

Sheet

a line used to control the sail

SHEX

Sundays/Holidays Excluded

SHIFTING

This refers to movements or changing positions of cargo from one place to another. This can easily endanger the seaworthiness or cargoworthiness of the ship.

SHINC

Sundays/Holidays Included

SHIP

A larger vessel usually thought of as being used for ocean travel. A vessel able to carry a "boat" on board.

SHIPPERS

Individuals or businesses who purchase transportation services or commodities.

SHIPPER'S COUNCIL

An organization of shippers formed to collectively and services with the conferences of ship operators.

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SHIP'S AGENT

A person or firm who transacts all business in a port on behalf of shipowners or charterers. Also called shipping agent; agent.

SHIP'S ARTICLES

a written agreement between the master of a ship and the crew concerning their employment. It includes rates of pay and capacity of each crewman, the date of commencement of the voyage and its duration.

SHIPS CHAIRMAN (SHOP STEWARD)

in charge of union business for unlicensed personnel. Handles grievances.

SHIP'S STABILITY

the seaworthiness of a ship regarding the centrifugal force which enables her to remain upright.

SHORT TON

2,000 pounds.

Shrouds

support wires for the mast

Sire

ship's inspection report:a database system of the OCIMF

SISTER SHIPS

Ships built on the same design.

SIU

Seafarers International Union.

SKIDS

Are bearers (timber or steel) positioned under the cargo to enable forklift handling at port, and for ease of rigging and lashing on board ship.

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SLACK

Not fastened; loose. Also, to loosen.

SLOP TANK

A tank in a tanker into which slops are pumped. These represent a residue of the ship's cargo of oil together with the water used to clean the cargo tanks. They are left to separate out in the slop tank.

SMarT

Support for Maritime Training scheme (UK)

SMC

safety management certificate (as per ISM Code)

SMS

safety management system

SN

Satellite Navigation - A form of position finding using radio transmissions from satellites with sophisticated on-board automatic equipment

SOC

Shipper Owned Container

SOF

Statement of Facts

SOFT CURRENCY

Currency which is not fully convertible to all currencies but only to some other soft currencies.

Solas

International Convention for Safety of Life at Sea,IMO

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SOLAS

Safety of Life a Sea Convention

SOLE

Cabin or saloon floor. Timber extensions on the bottom of the rudder. Also the molded fiberglass deck of a cockpit.

SOP

standard operating procedure

SOPEP 

Shipboard Oil Pollution Emergency Plan

SOSREP

Secretary of State's Representative for Marine salvage and Intervention

SOUNDING

a measurement of the depth of water.

SP

Safe Port

SPA

special protection area

SPI

ship-port interface, IMO

SPIDERING

Is the strengthening of circular tanks for transport, this prevents the tanks from becoming warped. The tanks are strengthened with steel or wood crossbeams giving a "spider" appearance

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Spinnaker

a large, light sail used in downwind sailing

SPM

single point mooring

SPOT (VOYAGE)

A charter for a particular vessel to move a single cargo between specified loading port(s) and discharge port(s) in the immediate future. Contract rate ("spot" rate) covers total operating expenses, i.e., bunkers, port charges, canal tolls, crew's wages

Spreaders

struts used to hold the shrouds away from the mast

Spring line

docking lines that keep the boat from drifting forward and back

SPRING LINE

a pivot line used in docking, undocking, or to prevent the boat from moving forward or astern while made fast to a dock.

SQUALL

a sudden, violent wind often accompanied by rain.

SQUARE KNOT

a knot used to join two lines of similar size. Also called a reef knot.

SRBL

Signing and Releasing Bill of Lading

SSHEX

Saturdays, Sundays, Holidays Excluded

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SSHINC (or SATSHINC)

Saturdays, Sundays, Holidays Included

ST

Short ton

STABILITY

It is paramount that a vessel is stable in all aspects at all times. When cargo is loaded/discharged, the stability is monitored by a computer, which takes into account the weight and position of cargo within the vessel.

STANDING PART

that part of a line which is made fast.The main part of a line as distinguished from the bight and the end.

STAND-ON VESSEL

that vessel which has right-of-way during a meeting, crossing, or overtaking situation.

STARBOARD

The right-hand side of a ship when facing the front or forward end. The starboard side of a ship during darkness is indicated by a green light.

Starboard tack

a course with the wind coming from starboard and the boom on the port side

STATION BILL

A list which shows the vessel's complement and details their various duties in connection with fire and boat drills.

STCW

International Convention on Standards of Training,Certification and Watchkeeping, IMO

STEM

Subject to Enough Merchandise (Availability of cargo). Also, the forward most part of the bow.

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Step

the frame that the bottom of the mast ends into

STERN

The aformost or after part of a ship

STERN LINE

a docking line leading from the stern.

STERNWAY

the reverse movement of a vessel.

STEWARD ASSISTANT

Clean galley and mess halls, set tables, prepare salads, Clean living quarters.

STORE

a general term for provisions, materials and supplies used aboard ship for the maintenance of the crew, and for the navigation, propulsion and upkeep of the vessel and its equipment.

STOW

to put An item in its proper place.

STOWAGE

the placing of goods in a ship in such a way as to ensure the Safety and stability of the ship not only on a Sea or ocean passage but Also in between ports when parts of the cargo have been loaded or discharged.

Stowage Factor

Cubic space (measurement tons occupied by one tonne (2240 lbs or 1000 kgs of cargo))

STRANDING

The running of a ship on shore on a beach.

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SUB

Subject (to). Depending upon as a condition

SUBC

self-unloading bulk carrier

Subject to

Depending upon as a condition

SUPERCARGO

Person employed by a ship owner, shipping company, charterer of a ship or shipper of goods to supervise cargo handling operations. Often called a port captain.

SWAD

Salt Water Arrival Draft

SWAMP

to fill with water, but Not settle to the bottom.

SWDD

Salt Water Departure Draft

SWL

safe working load

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